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While we wait to get everyone in our community vaccinated, it is important to remember that wearing a mask, social distancing, hand washing and monitoring yourself for symptoms are still the best ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Visit this website for the most up to date information!

 

The ECPHD has administered both Moderna and the Johnson and Johnson Janssen vaccine. We cannot guarantee a specific brand will be available. We are only able to administer what we are given from the State of Illinois. See below for comparisons of the Moderna and Johnson and Johnson Janssen vaccine. Edgar County has completed all vaccine phases and we are now vaccinating any Edgar County resident, age 18 and older.

Moderna vaccine Janssen vaccine
Target population Approved for people aged 18 and older. Approved for people aged 18 and older.
Vaccine efficacy
  • 94.1% effective at preventing symptomatic COVID-19 infection occurring at least 14 days after administration of the second dose.
  • Vaccine is 89% effective against hospitalizations and 100% effective against deaths from COVID-19.
  • 66.9% effective at preventing moderate to severe COVID-19 infection occurring at least 14 days after vaccine administration globally.
  • 76.7% effective at preventing severe/critical COVID-19 infection occurring at least 14 days after vaccine administration in the United States.
  • 85.4% effective at preventing severe/critical COVID-19 infection occurring at least 28 days after vaccine administration in the United States.
  • Vaccine is 100% effective against hospitalizations and deaths from COVID-19.
Vaccine administration Two shots are required, delivered 28 days apart. One shot is required.
Possible side effects
  • Most common side effects: injection site pain, fatigue, headache, muscle pain, joint pain, and fever.
  • Side effects are more common after the second dose and are reported more by younger adults.
  • Most common side effects: injection site reactions, headache, fatigue, myalgia, nausea, and fever.
  • Reactions were less commonly reported among participants 60 years of age and older.
Safety for pregnant/lactating individuals Pregnant/lactating people should discuss the risks and benefits with their provider. Pregnant/lactating people should discuss the risks and benefits with their provider.
For More Information:

 

1. The safety of COVID-19 vaccines is a top priority.

a. The U.S. vaccine safety system ensures that all vaccines are as safe as possible. Learn how federal partners are working together to ensure the safety of COVID-19 vaccines.

2. Many vaccines are being developed and tested, but some might be ready before others—CDC is planning for many possibilities.

a. CDC is working with partners at all levels, including healthcare associations, on flexible COVID-19 vaccination programs that can accommodate different vaccines and scenarios. CDC has been in contact with your state public health department to help with your state’s planning. State, tribal, local, and territorial health departments are critical to making sure vaccines are available to communities.

3. At least at first, COVID-19 vaccines might be used under an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

4. There may be a limited supply of COVID-19 vaccines before the end of 2020, but supply will continually increase in the weeks and months that follow.

a. The goal is for everyone to be able to easily get a COVID-19 vaccine as soon as large quantities are available. The plan is to have several thousand vaccination providers available, including doctors’ offices, retail pharmacies, hospitals, and federally qualified health centers.

5. If there is limited supply, some groups may be recommended to get a COVID-19 vaccine first.

a. Experts are working on how to distribute these limited vaccines in a fair, ethical, and transparent way.

6. At first, COVID-19 vaccines may not be recommended for children.

a. In early clinical trials for various COVID-19 vaccines, only non-pregnant adults participated. However, clinical trials continue to expand those recruited to participate. The groups recommended to receive the vaccines could change in the future.

7. Cost will not be an obstacle to getting vaccinated against COVID-19.

a. Vaccine doses purchased with U.S. taxpayer dollars will be given to the American people at no cost. However, vaccine providers will be able to charge administration fees for giving or administering the shot to someone. Vaccine providers can get this fee reimbursed by the patient’s public or private insurance company or, for uninsured patients, by the Health Resources and Services Administration’s Provider Relief Fund.

8. COVID-19 vaccine planning is being updated as new information becomes available.