While we encourage everyone in our community vaccinated, it is important to remember that wearing a mask, social distancing, hand washing and monitoring yourself for symptoms are still the best ways to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

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COVID-19 and the Delta Variant

Top 5 Things To Know

1. Getting vaccinated prevents severe illness, hospitalization, and death; it also helps reduce the spread of the virus in communities. Unvaccinated individuals should get vaccinated and continue masking until they are fully vaccinated. With the Delta variant, this is more urgent than ever. The highest spread of cases and severe outcomes is happening in places with low vaccination rates.

2. Data show Delta is different than past versions of the virus: it is much more contagious. Some vaccinated people can get Delta in a breakthrough infection and may be contagious. Even so, vaccinated individuals represent a very small amount of transmission occurring around the country. Virtually all hospitalizations and deaths continue to be among the unvaccinated.

3. In areas with substantial and high transmission, CDC recommends that everyone (including fully vaccinated individuals) wear a mask in public indoor settings to help prevent spread of Delta and protect others.

4. CDC recommends that community leaders encourage vaccination and masking to prevent further outbreaks in areas of substantial and high transmission.

5. CDC recommends universal indoor masking for all teachers, staff, students, and visitors to K-12 schools, regardless of vaccination status. Children should return to full-time in-person learning in the fall with layered prevention strategies in place.

Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy:

Most people in the United States are planning to get vaccinated against COVID-19, but some may want more information before seeking vaccination. They may want to know more about COVID-19 vaccines, including the process for developing and authorizing these vaccines and information about their safety and effectiveness. People may also have previous experiences that affect their trust and confidence in the health system, which could affect their decision to get vaccinated.

By taking time to listen to their concerns and answer their questions, you can help people become confident in their decision to get vaccinated. Also, when you decide to get vaccinated and share the reasons why you did, you can have a powerful influence on your family and community. Strong confidence in the vaccines within communities leads to more people getting vaccinated, which leads to fewer COVID-19 illnesses, hospitalizations, and deaths.

Addressing Common Hesitations

For more information on addressing vaccine hesitancy, please visit the CDC’s webpage: Building Confidence in COVID-19 Vaccines